The picture of the week

“The whole setting of this picture is reflecting the beauty and freedom of adventure motorcycle riding.” – Unknown adventure rider





Ride from Auckland to Wanganui

I had four days on my own to spend it on the motorcycle. I used this opportunity to ride from Auckland down to Wanganui.

Since I have ridden the Port Waikato area many times and posted a lot of pictures about it, I started to take photographs just at Raglan.



Sometimes I needed to stop to admire the glorious gravel roads waiting for me to ride.


Glorious gravel roads

Meet the grader machine. It turns the gravel roads to dirt roads for you. :-)


Meet the grader

Obviously, later it will be covered with fresh gravel and compacted.


Freshly graded road

Exciting landscape ahead.


The gravel road begins here (again)

I have found important to have regular stops to refresh myself.


Rest stop

The route cut through a very diverse landscape. My personal favorites were the ones traveling through forests.


Forest route

On long rides in remote areas, you need to have a good plan to refuel from time to time. Gas stations are scarce in some areas.


Morning fuel stop

Traffic jams are common everywhere in New Zealand, but I don’t mind this kind of traffic jam.


Morning traffic jam

I did travel some rarely used farm roads, no need to say these leads through the most beautiful or interesting sections.


Rarely used road

Taumaranui did look like a ghost town.



One of the rest stops to refresh myself and snap a couple of pictures.


Afternoon rest stop

The first glance of the Ruapehu.



Fishers Track was one of the highlights of this trip, but don’t do it alone.


Fishers Track

Close to halfway. The Wanganui River.


Wanganui River

The Wanganui River Road is a sealed road but there are enough roadworks on it to keep it interesting.


Wanganui River Road

King Country with its restless hills.


Restless hills

The Forgotten World Highway (SH34) is one very common element of motorcycle tours. Mostly sealed road with a short gravel section.



An almost empty town, Ohura. with only 120 or so residents.



A lovely spot to stop. Looks like a 17th or 18th-century romantic landscape painting.


Landscape with waterfall

There is no road trip in New Zealand without rain. Here is one which just passed by.



And finally back to the Waikato area.


Waikato area

Here is the route I did from Auckland down to Wanganui.




November – Ride report

Here are a brief account and a few photos of the KLR Ramblers ride from November.

Ten riders gathered at the Pokeno Fuel Stop on Saturday. The weather was good and everything else did look promising. The first quarter of the ride was just as good as the pre-ride. The conditions on  Klondyke Rd were on the challenging side slightly because the damage by the logging trucks and the not too fine repair works by the forestry company. Later at Port Waikato, we run into a road closure because of a car rally event further up on the road. Thanks to Adrian’s knowledge on the local roads we did find our way back to Onewhero, Wiramarama Rd, Baker Rd and finally we ended up at our pit-stop at Nikau Cave Coffe.

Because the first leg of the route was longer and took more time than we anticipated, after a good coffee and some food we broke-up and some of us headed back to Pokeno, but most of the group set out to finish the unridden part of the ride as it was planned.

I would like to thank Adrian to help us out with his local road knowledge, and Herman and Anton to take part in the pre-ride and leading this ride.

I believe we got the best what Waikato could offer on this Saturday.

This ride was the last in 2017 and we can meet again on 20 January 2018 for the first ride of 2018. We wish a very relaxing Christmas holiday to all of you with loads of fun time with loved ones, friends and on the motorcycle.

Here are a few pictures from the ride.



Taking fuel and adjusting the tire pressure before the ride


At the Pokeno Fuel Stop


At Nikau Cave Coffe


The weather was perfect for the ride


The best what Waikato could offer



Sunday Rambling

After the first “floating above the road” video, I did try to make a more lively video about the ride today. I hope it can make people excited about “adventure motorcycle riding”.

I know it isn’t a project which can compete with around the world documentaries, but I don’t want to do that at all.

It can still tickle the adventurer in everyone because all these, what you can see on the video is just at our door step. If you can spare 2-3 hours once in a month and put aside $3000-$4000 for a second hand motorcycle (it can be even cheaper if you are not afraid of doing some fixing and maintenance by yourself), you can ride the very same roads and much more.

I really hope you will enjoy the video.


Tank bag

We haven’t done a product review for a long time and this is right because we spent the time with organizing rides and riding together.I was eyeing with tank bags for a long time but didn’t take the effort to get to a higher energy level which results in action. Durin the motorcycle show, I could visit the few accessory resellers and find out, there is nothing available there what would please me.

I was eyeing with tank bags for a long time but didn’t take the effort to get to a higher energy level which results in action. Durin the motorcycle show, I could visit the few accessory resellers on the showground and find out, there is nothing available what would please me.


Since I wanted to stuff only some small things into the tank bag, like wallet, phone, camera, etc. I was looking for a small one. After doing some “research” on the Internet, I wanted the Kriega OS 6 with a tank adapter. Since all the nearby or accessible stores in NZ had only the old Kriega US 5 bags, I decided to order mine from Australia (MX Store). The Kriega OS 6 was designed to correct some design flaw of the Kriega US 5 bags, and funny enough, I could get it cheaper (including shipping) than walking into a shop in NZ and buy the old design.

So get down to the bag. I think the original design idea is following the MOLLE design line which was developed for the army and stands for “Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment”.

Since I was housebound for the weekend, I took my time to get things done properly.

The first thing what you need to do is secure two straps under your seat. It just did not go easy, the KLR presented a good mind-bending puzzle, to find not just a way to get this done, but get it done in the perfect way.


Finally, I got the two little plastic tabs sticking out from under the seat. Just in case, I put a bit of duct tape between the plastic tabs and the tank to prevent the paint being rubbed off.

Next item is to attach the tank adapter to it and drive two straps around the headstock of the KLR to secure it over the tank.


Yes, you see it correctly, it is covering the tank cap, and will need to be detached when I am filling up the motorcycle with petrol. I will find out later, how much trouble it is.

The Kriega OS 6 bag is neat and all the materials and the way of construction is convincing. It looks like something that will last, and this feeling is supported by the 10 years warranty coming with the bag.


After some wiggling and trial and error, I found the perfect place for the bag on the adapter and everything isn’t just ready for adventure now, but also looks good.


The summary of my experience is so far positive. Good materials, quality workmanship, and relatively easy installation. Let see how it will perform on the Northland Rally.