The next KLR Ramblers ride is on…

…21 April 2018. The details of the ride are here.

Until then, you can find rides and like-minded people in the Adventure Riding NZ forums.

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KLR Ramblers ride – April

The details of the ride

  • Date: 21 April 2018
  • Time: 10 am
  • Meeting point: Waitoki GAS Petrol Station
  • Where are we going? See the details below.
  • How are we going to ride? We are expecting you to be able to navigate through the ride on your own by using a map or with a GPS if you have one. (Files and information for both means of navigation are provided below.)
  • The whole ride will take approximately 4-4.5 hours and will cover approximately 200 km gravel and sealed road.

This time the route was put together by Anton and he will be the Road Captain. He put together a good explanation of the system, how he marked the route. If you don’t have a GPS don’t worry. Just turn up for the ride, we will leave no one behind.

Here is his explanation:

The route consists of waypoints. Each waypoint has a unique name. This name is a simple code. The code was developed with the idea to be easily readable, as short as possible and give as much information about a waypoint as practical.

Typical waypoint name is: 7Left10S

Name of each waypoint starts with a number, which represents a sequence number. This number goes from 1 to infinity with increments of 1.

The sequence number followed by the direction you need to keep at that waypoint. In the example it’s “Left”, so keep left. There are only three possible directions: “Left”, “Right” and “Straight”.

After direction goes a number, from 1 to 12 with an increment of 1. This number describes the “sharpness” of the turn. If you imagine a clock pointing 12 o’clock to your forward, 3 o’clock to your right and 9 to your left at the moment you are at that waypoint, then you could easily guess that “Left10” is light left turn and on the other hand “Right5” would be very sharp bend to the right.

“Direction word” and “sharpness number” gives very similar information and are for fast reading as well as for “security”. You need to guess only one word out of three, which have different length and visual “density” to get an idea where to go, confirmed with the number later.

In the example above, the name of a waypoint ends with a letter. That letter tells you where “other” road goes and from here you have almost complete information about the upcoming intersection. In our case, we want to go left, but a secondary/unwanted road going straight (“S” for Straight). From all information above we can conclude that the junction we are approaching is almost “Y” type intersection and we need to be extra careful because the main road going straight which means its easy to skip the turn.

Types of intersections are:
L – “other” road goes to the Left
R – “other” road goes to the Right
S – “other” road goes Straight
X – Intersection like a cross
O – Roundabout

Then it comes down to a roundabout, we would have one digit after “O” to tell us exit number.

Sometimes, you could notice explanation mark at the end of a waypoint name. The purpose of this is to get your attention. It’s could be a tricky intersection or one waypoint followed by another in a very short distance, something like 400 meters or less, so you need to keep attention at your GPS unit for following instructions.

In rare cases you need just a waypoint to have a right direction of a route or any other reason, then at the end of waypoint name add “A” (for “additional” or “auxiliary”). And don’t be puzzled to see “24Straght12A”, it’s just to confirm that you are going correctly.

A few more examples of waypoint names and information that they provide:

18Right3O3
It’s going to be a roundabout. We are going to the right. We need to take the third exit.

34Left11R!
We are going to do an easy left turn. We don’t go to the right. We need to pay an extra attention because the next waypoint is within a very short distance

4Left7X
Very sharp left turn on “cross” type intersection

There will be one auxiliary rider. He or she will leave the start last and will be the last in the pack. You can also contact the auxiliary rider on mobile-phone if need. We will select this rider later and share the phone number with you at the start.

Be prepared to ride on gravel (in various conditions) and sealed public roads. There are no plans to ride off-road. All kinds of bikes are welcome not just KLR650.

Save the date on your calendar and download all the information what you need.

Map

GPX file

 

Click here for the GPX file with the route.

See my earlier post on how to download the file if you need some help.

If you are riding with us, we will assume, you have read, understood and accepted our “Legal disclaimer”. Click here to read the legal stuff.

lic

What would you like?

We would like to make the KLR Ramblers rides more fitting for everyone. I put together the below questionnaire to try to find out your preference.

We will keep the rides on the third Saturday of every month, but the time, location and length of the ride can be changed. Please fill out the form below and if you have more to say, please do not shy away from using our contact form to let us know your thoughts.

A new kind of motorcycle race

In 2018 we are looking forward to a new multi-discipline, motorcycle championship.

wess

It is named as World Enduro Super Series (WESS for short) and brings together Hard Enduro, Classic Enduro, Cross-Country and Beach Racing style events. Sounds like an adventure. Beside combining different enduro events, I like the approach to let mix the pro and amateur riders. Unfortunately many enduro and motocross events are strictly separating professionals from amateur riders by rules or the technical/financial means.

Personally I am really looking forward the first event on 11-13 May 2018, the Extreme XL Lagares, Extreme Enduro race in Portugal.

The WESS website is here.

KLR Ramblers ride – March

 

The details of the ride

  • Date: 17 March 2018
  • Time: 9 am
  • Meeting point: Puhoi Domain Carpark
  • Where are we going? See the details below.
  • How are we going to ride? We are expecting you to be able to navigate through the ride on your own by using a map or with a GPS if you have one. (Files and information for both means of navigation are provided below.)
  • The whole ride will take approximately 4-4.5 hours and will cover roughly 213 km gravel and sealed road.

There will be one auxiliary rider. He or she will leave the start last and will be the last in the pack. You can also contact the auxiliary rider on mobile-phone if need. We will select this rider later and share the phone number with you at the start.

Be prepared to ride on gravel (in various conditions) and sealed public roads. There are no plans to ride off-road. All kinds of bikes are welcome not just KLR650.

Save the date on your calendar and download all the information what you need.

Map

GPX file

Click here for the GPX file.

See my earlier post on how to download the file if you need some help.

If you are riding with us, we will assume, you have read, understood and accepted our “Legal disclaimer”. Click here to read the legal stuff.

lic