The next KLR Ramblers ride is on…

…20 January 2018. The details of the ride are coming soon, we are planning something a little different from what we did so far.

In the meantime, you can find rides and like-minded people in the Adventure Riding NZ forums.

We wish a very relaxing Christmas holiday to all of you with loads of fun time with loved ones, friends and on the motorcycle.

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November – Ride report

Here are a brief account and a few photos of the KLR Ramblers ride from November.

Ten riders gathered at the Pokeno Fuel Stop on Saturday. The weather was good and everything else did look promising. The first quarter of the ride was just as good as the pre-ride. The conditions on  Klondyke Rd were on the challenging side slightly because the damage by the logging trucks and the not too fine repair works by the forestry company. Later at Port Waikato, we run into a road closure because of a car rally event further up on the road. Thanks to Adrian’s knowledge on the local roads we did find our way back to Onewhero, Wiramarama Rd, Baker Rd and finally we ended up at our pit-stop at Nikau Cave Coffe.

Because the first leg of the route was longer and took more time than we anticipated, after a good coffee and some food we broke-up and some of us headed back to Pokeno, but most of the group set out to finish the unridden part of the ride as it was planned.

I would like to thank Adrian to help us out with his local road knowledge, and Herman and Anton to take part in the pre-ride and leading this ride.

I believe we got the best what Waikato could offer on this Saturday.

This ride was the last in 2017 and we can meet again on 20 January 2018 for the first ride of 2018. We wish a very relaxing Christmas holiday to all of you with loads of fun time with loved ones, friends and on the motorcycle.

Here are a few pictures from the ride.

 

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Taking fuel and adjusting the tire pressure before the ride
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At the Pokeno Fuel Stop
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At Nikau Cave Coffe
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The weather was perfect for the ride
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The best what Waikato could offer

 

 

 

KLR Ramblers ride – November

The details of the November ride as follow:

  • Date: 18 November 2017
  • Time: 9 am
  • Meeting point: Pokeno – Pokeno Fuel Stop (Corner of Great South Road and Market Street) You can adjust the tire pressure and top-up your fuel there if need to.
  • Where are we going? See the details below.
  • How are we going to ride? We are expecting you to be able to navigate through the ride on your own by using a map or with a GPS if you have one. (Files and information for both means of navigation are provided below.)
  • The whole ride will take approximately 4 – 4.5 hours and will cover roughly 170 km gravel and sealed road.

There will be one auxiliary rider. He or she will leave the start last and will be the last in the pack. You can also contact the auxiliary rider on mobile-phone if need. We will select this rider later and share the phone number with you at the start.

Be prepared to ride on gravel (in various conditions) and sealed public roads. All kinds of bikes are welcome not just KLR650.

Save the date on your calendar and download all the information what you need.

Map:

The GPX file:

Click here for the GPX file.

If you are riding with us, we will assume, you have read, understood and accepted our “Legal disclaimer”. Click here to read the legal stuff.

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Honey! Am I fat?

A fellow rider got intrigued by the previous article on the weight of the KLR 650 and measured his.

He has a California model KLR with only two additions he made.

  • SW-MOTECH crash bars
  • a plastic toolbox for storage on the rear rack

Apart from these, the motorcycle is all stock.

Since he knows the weight of the crash bars and the box at the back, the weight of the stock KLR was easy to calculate.

It is 205 Kg, 9 Kg more than advertised in the technical specifications.

Indeed, the KLR can be considered fat, and very difficult to reduce its weight significantly.

Losing weight, gaining muscles

Today I have done what I wanted to do a very long time ago, weighted my KLR. There were a loads of swaps and changes on the KLR since it rolled out from the dealership, and many of these changes had the aim to reduce the weight of the motorcycle.

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How much does it weights?

Let see what have been done.

  • Swapping the stock plastic hand guards to Barkbuster Storm hand guards. It is a bit of additional weight but I am not sure how much. I consider this as a must for me and I don’t care about its weight. The Barkbuster hand guards are saved my controls and my hand a number of times already.
  • SW Motech crash bars. Definitely additional weight, but after cracking the plastic fairing it was considered a must have for me, just like the hand guards. I didn’t dare to measure this heavy stuff. Must weight a ton. :-)
  • I did swap the stock foot pegs to the IMS Super Stock foot pegs. It was a change for more comfort and stability. Although I did not measure these items, I believe, these are slightly lighter than the stock pegs.
  • With the change of the footpegs I was in the need for a slightly longer gear shift leaver. The IMS Flightline Shift Lever compliments nicely the foot pegs. I opted for the one inch longer version.
  • Another change for comfort was the ARTRAX handlebar risers. Definitely additional weight, but not much. You need to be aware of the fact that a loads of small things will add up and 100 gramms will accumulate to Kilograms.
  • I have changed the stock windscreen to the Zero Gravity Sport Touring windscreen also in the hope of more comfort. It did worked well and added a clip on extension to it for a mix of additional comfort and “optical tuning”. Little more weight again.
  • Let’s get down to the heavy weight stuff. Changing the stock battery to a Li-Ion was definitely about losing weight. The battery project ended up with shredding off 3.8 Kg from the KLR.
  • Changing the muffler to the FMF Q4 was also definitely about losing weight. More precisely about losing 3 Kg. The good thing in the FMF Q4, that it has a spark arrestor and a quiet insert which definitely makes it a pass on the WoF but the sound of the motorcycle is changing to awesome.
  • Together with some extra hardware (nuts, bolts, spacers and aluminum plates) a plastic toolbox has been added to the rear rack for a convenient but inexpensive storage space. It looks like the Pelican cases, but it is the cheap Chinese version. Newer measured the weight of it, the practicality overweights it.
  •  have taken off the plastic sub fender for visual improvement and weight saving in 50-50%.
  • Finally we can count some extra weight, represented by nick-necks like GPS holder, USB charger and extra cables, mounting straps for the tank bag and such.

I am not sure you have read everything above, and I don’t blame you. I wouldn’t read it entirely because I would like to know only the final number, so here it is.

199 Kg

The KLR in its final form weights one hundred and ninety-nine Kilograms. I definitely expected less, but doing a bit more counting makes the figures look nice.

The motorcycle was serviced a couple of weeks ago, so it has all the fluids, such as engine oil, coolant, brake fluids, etc. as it is in the manual. Before the weighting I had a stop at the petrol station and filled up the tank to the rim to present the motorcycle as heavy as possible.

By the manual, the curb weight of the 2014 KLR 650 is 196Kg. After a second read and re-considering the loads of extra additions the 3 Kg plus isn’t that much. I am pleased with the KLR.

 

October – Ride report

The KLR Ramblers ride for October was the Northland Rally on Labour Weekend. It was a long and definitely a fun ride. Unfortunately, Joao needed to turn back, because of a nasty electric fault on his motorcycle on Saturday morning.

Anton was the only rider who made it from Auckland to Cape Reinga on Saturday at the end.

Sunday morning three of us started the ride to Kerikeri and there two more riders joined the pack on the way back on Monday.

We were happy to see Mark joining the first leg of the ride on Monday and the last part on Monday.

Thank you for all of you (in alphabetical order: Adrian, Anton, Herman, Joao, Mark and both Rob) to joining the ride. I am looking forward to riding together again sometime.

Here are a few pictures from the ride.
(Click on the pictures for the full-size image.)

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Starting the Saturday ride
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Starting the Sunday ride
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On the road
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Leaving Kerikeri
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Re-fueling at the beginning of the “One Day Ride”
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Happy bunch :-)

Sunday Rambling

After the first “floating above the road” video, I did try to make a more lively video about the ride today. I hope it can make people excited about “adventure motorcycle riding”.

I know it isn’t a project which can compete with around the world documentaries, but I don’t want to do that at all.

It can still tickle the adventurer in everyone because all these, what you can see on the video is just at our door step. If you can spare 2-3 hours once in a month and put aside $3000-$4000 for a second hand motorcycle (it can be even cheaper if you are not afraid of doing some fixing and maintenance by yourself), you can ride the very same roads and much more.

I really hope you will enjoy the video.